Fortnightly(ish) review: Albright, Obama, Hankx3

Madeline Albright is to receive a Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz award for her “jazz diplomacy” next month.  Read about that diplomacy, and Bill Clinton’s saxophone skills, in this article from the Washington Post.

Hank Williams Jr recently called President Obama anti-American.  Jr told an 8,500 strong crowd at a concert in Iowa that “we’ve got a Muslim president who hates farming, hates the military, hates the US and we hate him”.  This review of his latest album calls it a “well-produced parody of Southern culture and Tea Party politics”.  Hank Williams Jr is my least favourite Hank, even just from a musical perspective.  We all know his Dad, so here’s something from his son, Hank Williams III, an interesting character I recommend checking out.

Who knew Insane Clown Posse were still a thing?  Their fans identify as Juggalos.  Genius.  Problem is, the FBI classified Juggalos collectively as a “loosely organized hybrid gang” and “criminal organization formed on the street” in its 2011 Gang Threat Assessment.  The Posse has decided to hit back and is suing the FBI for defaming its fans.  Those insane clowns.

Back to Obama, apparently hip-hop has given up on the once hip-hop President.  Perhaps to compensate, Obama’s campaign office has put out a video showing his support from DJs.

And so from America to the rest of the world.  Well at least South and Central Asia…Goths in Uzbekistan are having a hard time. Read about their travails, including government clamp downs on the “alien” musical genres of rock, rap and metal in this BBC article.  A recent edition of ABC Radio National’s Correspondents Report visited Afghanistan’s rock school.  And, finally, read about Sufi music and sectarian politics in neighbouring Pakistan in the cleverly but misleadingly titled ‘Peace, Love & Pakistan‘ on the Global Mail.

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Fortnightlyish review: Iranian pop, Tunisian hip-hop and one very silly Trade Minister

This 4th of July was about much more than America, but I do like some of the songs highlighted by PopMatters in their 4 July list (of course) of American punk protest songs.

 

News: Atonal Australian Politics, It’s a Dance Off and Jazz in Kyrgystan

The incredibly divisive price/tax on carbon (dioxide) came into effect in Australia on July 1.  Over the last 12 or so months the opposition Liberal party has been running a pretty successful scare campaign against the measure, which once enjoyed bi-partisan and broad public support.  The governing Labor party was in turn hoping to turn that negativity upon itself by highlighting its absurdity when the world didn’t end with the policy’s commencement.  This is all by way of explanation for why the Australian public was subjected to the horrific spectacle of Trade Minister Craig Emerson singing Skyhooks this week.  What Emerson (and presumably Labor-party strategists) failed to consider was the fact that the public would not be impressed  by a an attempt to discredit cynical political stunts with a cynical (and poorly executed) political stunt.

In other news, Malaysia and Indonesia are squaring off over ownership of the Tor-tor folk dance, with two people arrested outside Malaysia’s embassy in Jakarta.  The Jakarta Globe reports that the dispute has been escalated to Foreign Minister-level talks.

The Washington Times has an article on the flourishing jazz scene in Kyrgystan.  All ‘western’ music was banned under Soviet Rule in Kyrgystan, but for reasons left unexplained, jazz was particularly reviled.

Opinion: Simone Felice, Excentrik and Sociopolitical analysis via mp3

The Australian‘s Denis Atkins loves Simone Felice.  I’m not a huge fan of the production – ‘uplifting’ piano and handclapping is rarely a good thing – but otherwise reckon ‘New York Times’ is a great song.  I guess it’s about how it’s better to stay anonymous and out of the cynical big city and its newspapers.

Rebel Frequencies has an excellent piece on Palestinian-American musician Excentrik.  I highly recommend checking out the article and the track below.

Dusted has a review of the compilation Rangarang: Pre-revolutionary Iranian Pop.  Perhaps Googoosha (refer previous post) took some inspiration from Iran’s Googoosh, who is a million times better, by the way.  The reviewer praises the music but is critical of the motives of the label.

I don’t think the Dusted reviewer would like this article from The Atlantic which does the old get-to-know-the-real-country X-through-its-underground-music routine with Tunisia and hip-hop.

 

We’re about to go on Naadam holidays here in Mongolia, so expect it to be quiet (well, quieter than usual) around here for a bit.

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